The Mint Blog

  1. An image of the author: Andy Bell

    Startups at Mint

    Posted in by Andy Bell on 17 September 2012

    My favourite Mint job ad ever said:

    We all have a responsibility to help those less experienced than ourselves… It's the nature of life that we can never really repay those mentors, so the only thing we can do is help others to develop their skills as well.

    What's true for individuals is also true for companies. Mint has been tremendously fortunate with the help we received - particularly from our chairman David Frank. We are keen to pass the good karma along.

    For the next three months, we're sharing our London office with two startups:

    • Kooki - a mobile loyalty card app

    • SketchStreet - a crowd-sourced fashion community, with built-in fulfilment

    We hope they'll benefit from mingling with like-minded souls. We hope to learn something from their entrepreneurialism.

    (Close followers of Mint may notice this is similar to last year's Don't Be A Banker scholarship.)

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  2. An image of the author: Andy Bell

    New investment for Picklive

    Posted in by Andy Bell on 17 September 2012

    (Apologies, this news is about 6 weeks late.)

    Picklive, the real-time fantasy football game spun out from Mint, has sold to a team headed by David Galan, CEO of Sports Millions. Galan says:

    We are delighted to have acquired Picklive. The founding team has developed world-class and truly innovative technology, which we believe is a unique fusion of sportsbetting, in-play engagement and social style gaming and that will undoubtedly appeal to gaming operators.

    It’s great for Picklive as it gets the financial clout and distribution expertise to take it to the next stage. It’s great for Mint, as Noam and, shortly, Tim, return to the mothership. Welcome back, guys!

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  3. BloomBox

    I totally agree with Liz Murdoch that TV is failing to keep pace with the digital revolution. But I totally disagree with her suggested solution: more collaboration between the big players. These collaborations may deliver big infrastructure projects like YouView (of doubtful creative impact, in my opinion) but they will do nothing to deliver new formats making clever use of new technology, which is where the UK's great talent lies and where real value will be generated. 

    Reality shows like Big Brother were made possible by cheap, robust offline editing, allowing the story to be pieced together after filming rather than before. The new wave of talent shows were made possible by large-scale telephone voting systems. New technology enables new formats, but in surprising ways that can only be discovered by creative experimentation.

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  4. An image of the author: Andy Bell

    Antifragile web systems

    Posted in by Andy Bell on 30 August 2012

    Slides and notes from talk at Ignite Ubelly. 

    Slide01

    This is very speculative and I don’t know what I am talking about… but I think this is a really interesting concept, so I’d be delighted to hear any thoughts or suggestions.

    Slide02

    Antifragile is a new book from Nassim Nicolas Taleb. It's not out yet but a couple of chapters are online (prologue, chapter 12).

    His previous book was The Black Swan. This is in a similar territory. They both explore how we can think about and profit from the unknown.

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  5. Fleurdeforce

    Last week I attended the Media Guardian Edinburgh International Television Festival - the UK TV industry's annual decampment to the festival city for three boozy days of keynotes and canapés. Post bank-holiday, the dust has just about settled on Elisabeth Murdoch's MacTaggart (read the full text here), which went down pretty well on the ground, and doesn't seem to have ruffled too many feathers elsewhere.

    For my part, I was most interested in what Murdoch had to say about what she called the "explosive emergence of a made-for-online video category". MGEITF was "powered by YouTube" - keeping delegates going with a swanky smoothie bar and getting highlights from every session online in the blink of an eye. But it was a small, low-profile panel session called 'Who needs a commission anyway?' that got to the heart of what YouTube means to the industry today.

    To preface this, a personal confession: I'm embarrassingly obsessed with watching YouTube 'beauty gurus'. I'm not sure where it comes from - I don't even wear that much make-up - but I just can't stop watching them . My absolute favourite 'guru' (horrible word) is the entirely delightful FleurDeForce, a 24 year old with nearly 400,000 subscribers on her beauty channel, a wildly popular vlogging channel and a bridal channel. She's massive in the States too, with fans queuing for up to 14 hours to meet her at VidCon. A one-woman broadcast network.

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